CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

 

Thank you to our speakers all spaces are filled!

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: KEN FIELD, Esri

 

 

Ken is a professional ‘cartonerd’ with a Bachelors in cartography and a PhD in GIS. He’s a former academic from the
United Kingdom but after getting tired of admin and bureaucracy he ditched his 20 year academic career, moved to the
US and, since 2011, he talks and writes about cartography, teaches, makes maps, and still gets frustrated with ArcGIS
crashing at Esri but it’s part of his job to reduce that particular problem. He has presented and published an awful lot. He sometimes blogs, he tweets way too much, is past Editor of The Cartographic Journal, and Co-Chair of the ICA Map Design Commission.

He’s won a few awards for maps, ideas and methods for cartographic education and kitchen tile designs.

He is author of the best-selling book CARTOGRAPHY (full stop) and recently taught a MOOC to over 100,000
people interested in making better maps. He is co-founder of longitude.space and mappery.org. Despite evidence to the contrary, life’s not all about maps, and Ken can also be found on a snowboard, behind a drum kit, building Lego, walking @wisley_dog, being in awe of his far more talented better half @lindabeale, or supporting his hometown football team, Nottingham Forest whom he continues to hope will once again be the great team he grew up watching.

 

Keynote Talk: Ken Field, Esri, Giving Back to Cartography

Cartography. We’ve been through a lot. I’ve written you a book. Hopefully others will read it and get excited about you in the same way I have. I’ve created an online course for others to learn a bit more about you too, and a series of web sites and events that promote you in different ways. In this talk I’ll share my passion for cartography and reveal my relationship with cartography to date, and how my current focus is about giving back to the discipline to help others on their own cartographic journey. There’s pain and humour along the way. It’s often been a fraught relationship. It’s a scrapbook of my life in cartography from student, through academia to the corporate world. I’ll explore the backstories, the hidden work, challenges and often brutal reality of negotiating a path to get things done. I’ll also reveal the next chapter.

 

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Alessandro Alasia, Stastistics Canada

 

 

Alessandro Alasia is Chief of the Data Exploration and Integration Lab (DEIL) at the Centre for Special Business Projects, Statistics Canada, where he leads a multidisciplinary team dedicated to leading-edge custom project and innovative work. Alessandro has been working full-time at Statistics Canada since 2007. Prior to his current appointment, Alessandro has led several research projects with the Agriculture Division (Statistics Canada) and with the Rural and Cooperatives Secretariat (AAFC) as consultant and post-doctoral fellow. Since 2017, he has been Chair of the Working Party on Territorial Indicators at the OECD, where he has contributed to several national and regional Territorial Reviews, as well as to various initiatives on the modernization of statistical systems for better data on regions and cities. Alessandro graduated in Economics from the University of Torino (Italy), earned a MSc from the School of Specialization in Agriculture Economics and Business of the Catholic University (Italy), and a PhD in Agricultural Economics with specialization in Rural Studies from the University of Guelph.

 

Keynote Talk: Alessandro Alasia, Stastistics Canada, The Linkable Open Data Environment – LODE: Open Data, Open Tools, and Open Collaborators

Over the last few years, the Data Exploration and Integration Lab (DEIL) at Statistics Canada has conducted an increasing amount of work with open data using various open source tools in an open ecosystem. This work has now evolved into an initiative called Linkable Open Data Environment (LODE) (https://www.statcan.gc.ca/eng/lode). To date, achievements include the release of an Open Database of Buildings, which, in collaboration with Microsoft’s release, provides a mapping of virtually all buildings across Canada, an Open Database of Educational Facilities, and preliminary versions of open databases of addresses, businesses, hospitals, recreational facilities, infrastructure, and much more. In parallel, DEIL has created open versions of compilation codes and is developing other open source tools for data processing, as well as a mapping application for data visualization. These open databases, the associated tools, and the collaborations that have flourished around these endeavours are providing insights on the potential of data value multiplication through stakeholder engagement and their use of and enrichment of the original baseline datasets.

 

Featured Speakers:

Melanie Chabot & Antoni Ros Martinez, Canadian Red Cross

Mapping for Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Response

The Canadian Red Cross has a growing GIS capacity to support the needs of emergency response as well as developing disaster risk reduction efforts in communities. In this presentation, members of the Canadian Red Cross will speak to the GIS processes and products used when responding to emergencies in Manitoba and across the country as well as the Missing Maps pilot project. This project engages rural communities to improve spatial data coverage in OpenStreetMap for use in disaster preparedness efforts and emergency planning.

Bio:

Melanie has been with the Canadian Red Cross for 1 year as the GIS Coordinator leading the Missing Maps domestic pilot project, responsible for managing the project and for recruiting and managing CRC’s first mapping volunteer team to support Missing Maps and wider GIS activities. Before that, Melanie was conducting research at the University of Guelph in Ontario that focused on measuring surface roughness with terrestrial LiDAR and improving soil moisture estimates from radar remote sensing. She currently lives in Hudson Bay, SK – a small community near the MB border that is ironically 800 km SW of the body of water after which it is named.

Toni started over two years ago with the Canadian Red Cross (CRC) in Alberta; first as an Emergency Management Volunteer, later as an Emergency Management Coordinator and currently as the GIS Analyst for Canadian Operations. In his current role, Toni is responsible for: acting as CRC’s focal point for geo-spatial analyses and geomatics; leading the GIS team during emergency response; GIS tool maintenance & development; relationship building for geo-spatial data sharing with key stakeholders; and supports the Missing Maps program where necessary. Originally from Barcelona, Toni is fluent in three languages and before moving to Canada, he worked and lived in 5 different countries across three continents. Toni holds a MSc in Geography of Environmental Risks & Human Security, a Masters degree in Cartographic Production & GIS and a Bachelors in Geography

Ken Field, Esri

Cartographic Tips with ArcGIS Pro

A whirlwind look at a range of hints, tips and tricks to make your maps sing in ArcGIS Pro.  Whether you’re a newcomer to Pro, or a seasoned professional, this session will showcase some great ways you can take your maps to the next level. Specifically, we’ll look at ways of using symbology in interesting ways, the use of styles to streamline your workflows, and how to go beyond the defaults to make compelling and inspiring maps.

Bio:

Ken is a professional ‘cartonerd’ with a Bachelors in cartography and a PhD in GIS. He’s a former academic from the United Kingdom but after getting tired of admin and bureaucracy he ditched his 20 year academic career, moved to the US and, since 2011, he talks and writes about cartography, teaches, makes maps, and still gets frustrated with ArcGIS crashing at Esri but it’s part of his job to reduce that particular problem. He has presented and published an awful lot. He sometimes blogs, he tweets way too much, is past Editor of The Cartographic Journal, and Co-Chair of the ICA Map Design Commission.

He’s won a few awards for maps, ideas and methods for cartographic education and kitchen tile designs.

He is author of the best-selling book CARTOGRAPHY (full stop) and recently taught a MOOC to over 100,000 people interested in making better maps. He is co-founder of longitude.space and mappery.org. Despite evidence to the contrary, life’s not all about maps, and Ken can also be found on a snowboard, behind a drum kit, building Lego, walking @wisley_dog, being in awe of his far more talented better half @lindabeale, or supporting his hometown football team, Nottingham Forest whom he continues to hope will once again be the great team he grew up watching.

Concurrent Speakers:

Susan Witherly, Ducks Unlimited Canada

GIS is everywhere and easy: Has increased access to GIS technologies fostered compliancy in the use of geospatial data and statistics?

Geospatial data has become more readily available to GIS users, and increasingly assessible to non-GIS professionals. Governments and institutions create, manage, and distribute geospatial data either for download or available through web-based services. Satellite imagery continues to become more pervasive and available in ready-to-use formats. Numerous options exist not only for acquiring geospatial data but also for geoprocessing and cloud computing. The rise in geospatial data and processing tools brings many opportunities to casual and dedicated geomatics professionals alike. The proliferation of desktop GIS and web-mapping platforms has made spatial data more accessible than ever, but have perceptions relating to precision and accuracy of geospatial data and the interpretation of maps accompanied this rise in accessibility? Topics relating to communicating with geospatial data, the use of spatial statistics, and cartographic principles will be discussed within the context of today’s GIS is everywhere ideology.

Bio:

Susan studied geography at the University of Toronto, then returned to her home province of Nova Scotia to complete the GIS program at the Centre of Geographic Sciences. More recently, she completed her MSc. in Biology at the University of Winnipeg. Susan joined the Institute of Wetland and Waterfowl Research in 2008 after beginning her career with Ducks Unlimited Canada in Saskatchewan. Susan works with relational databases, remote sensing data, mobile mapping technology, and spatial statistics to provide spatial analysis and geomatics support for many of IWWR’s research projects. In addition to belonging to the Manitoba GIS Users Group, Susan holds membership to the Canadian Association of Geographers, the Society of Conservation in GIS, and The Wildlife Society.

Glen McDonald

A Conceptual GIS Vulnerability Model for Unsafe Drinking Water in Relation to Hydraulic Fracturing: A Southwestern Manitoba Case Study

Fracking has become a major fossil fuel source providing $37 billion to the Canadian economy in 2016 and $15 billion in taxes and royalties from 2013 to 2015. By current estimates, if annual reserves of 207 billion barrels are used up every year North America will only be energy self-sufficient for the next 10-15 years. There is substantial political and industry pressure to develop these reserves. However, hydraulic fracturing has potential environmental impacts from sub-surface contamination of aquifers from fracking fluid, surface and groundwater contamination, noise and air pollution, possible seismic instability, and long-term chronic health effects related to drinking water. The objective of this study is to develop a GIS digital conceptual model for Ground Water Protection in GIS that will inform future environmental mitigation policies.

Bio:

Glen is a 24 year veteran of the Royal Canadian Air Force who upon his release in 2014 as the lead geomatics officer for 1 Canadian Air Division here in Winnipeg pursued and attained a Masters of Environment in Science and Policy from the University of Manitoba in 2017.  Since then he has completed a 3 year post graduate certificate in Environmental and Occupational Health through the University of Victoria as of August of this year.  He specialized in ground water and risk management.  Glen is currently self employed as a qualified bioresonance therapist in Lorette MB and is currently seeking full time employment in his field of study.

Jocelynn Johnson, GeoManitoba/Cetus Research and Conservation

Where are the Whales? A survey 123 project

Cetus Research and Conservation Society had minimal GIS abilities. Incorrect locations, duplicated entries, twenty different spelling variations of a single field attribute all led to problematic data. The need to report their activities on an annual basis to the Department of Fisheries led them to seek out GIS capabilities through the British Columbia Institute of Technology capstone project program.

In four short months, a Survey 123 application, story map and an external and internal AGOL application for recording their data in real-time was developed. This presentation will explain how this non-profit’s pilot into GIS went from using screenshots of Google maps to Esri technologies.

Bio:

Jocelynn Johnson, GISP, graduated from the University of Manitoba with a B.Sc in Geological Sciences, from Red River College in with a diploma in Web Development, and most recently from the British Columbia Institute of Technology with a Bachelors of Technology in Geographic Information Systems. She spent nearly a year working with Cetus Research and Conservation Society remotely developing their GIS pilot project as part of the B.Tech degree.

Her work history is diverse including positions at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum- Mineral Sciences, the Manitoba Geological Survey, and Manitoba Infrastructure before arriving at her current position at the Government of Manitoba Sustainable Development – GeoManitoba as a GIS Technologist. Jocelynn is the Past-President of the Manitoba GIS User Group, as well as, sits on the board of GeoAlliance and encourages everyone to get involved with their local GIS User Groups.

Matthew Johnson, M3 Aerial Productions

How The New Drone Regulations Have Opened Up the Industry

Canadian drone users have been dealing with a complex, confusing and ultimately broken Government process for managing commercial operations for years. As of July 1st, 2019, Canada has set itself as the global leader in drone (or “Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems”) regulation; opening up the industry by simplifying and streamlining the certification process, and decreasing restrictions on use. This presentation will discuss how industry users are benefiting greatly by the new changes.

Bio:

Matthew is a former mathematics teacher and Captain in the Canadian Armed Forces, and is a former member of the MGUG Board of Directors. He founded M3 Aerial Productions in 2015 as a drone training and services company and has trained over 800 remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS), or “drone”, pilots across Canada to date. In 2018 Matthew was named as one of the Top 50 Drone Visionaries by the Commercial UAV News, and was invited to speak as a keynote presenter at the Drone Synergies conference in Dubai in November 2018.

In May 2019, M3 hosted the first annual Western Drone Show in Winnipeg, a conference that introduced teachers and school administrators to drone industry professionals. Over 150 drone operators from various industry niches attended the conference to hear about the latest applications of drone technology, and updates on regulatory changes that were introduced by Transport Canada on June 1st, 2019.

The industry has changed a great amount over the past few years, and the new regulations have greatly simplified the process of becoming an RPAS pilot in Canada. Come learn about the latest updates in the Canadian drone industry!

Henry (Hank) Venema & Matt Sebesteny, Strategic Community Consulting Inc.

High-Dimension Geospatial Optimization and Visualization Methods for Community Flood Protection

Adequate climate change adaptation strategies help jurisdictions become more economically resilient to climate change shock by detaching asset classes from climate risk, and attracting investors looking to finance smart low-risk infrastructure. This is becoming increasingly important in the highly likely transition into hotter growing seasons and increasingly variable hydrologic conditions. These plans allow jurisdictions to efficaciously understand their natural systems; to help plan, prioritize and execute capacity building programs; and develop better long-term and acute asset management for timely delivery of needed services.
Natural Infrastructure is a new concept for community flood protection, which works by retaining floodwaters in areas of watersheds that produce the most benefits at the least cost. Harvesting floodwaters for later reuse in irrigation, for groundwater recharge and for water quality protection is an important climate adaptation strategy. Identifying the best areas for retention storage of floodwater is a complex, high-dimension geospatial optimization problem.

Bio:

Strongly committed to sustainable development leadership, innovation and implementation, Hank holds a Ph.D in Systems Design Engineering from the University of Waterloo, with a diverse technical and management background spanning climate change, renewable energy, water resources, urban planning, agriculture, operations research, public health and environmental economics.

Throughout his professional career, Hank held various research and leadership positions at the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD), including Director, Chief Scientist and Vice President for Science and Innovation. He led the creation and management of many of IISD’s signature programs, such as the Water Innovation Centre focused on the Lake Winnipeg Basin, saving and reviving the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) research program, and most recently, the creation of the Prairie Climate Centre with the University of Winnipeg. It is with the Prairie Climate Centre that Hank pioneered research on design and investment principles for climate-resilient natural infrastructure based on the concept that ecosystem management is both climate change mitigation and adaptation.

Hank has over a decade of experience consulting to the Province of Manitoba and the Government of Canada on wide variety of surface water management, including Lake Winnipeg Basin management, watershed management, water quality trading, ecosystem services and bioeconomic development.

As SCC’s Chief Technology Officer, Hank uses an interdisciplinary approach to design natural infrastructure systems.

Matt’s Bio can be found in his Workshop talk.

Sean Frey, Parks Canada

Using open source tools and imagery for detailed land classifications in Riding Mountain National Park

A supervised classification process using QGIS with the Dzetsaka plugin is described and mulitple algorithms are examined including Gaussian Mixture Model, Random Forest Model, K-Nearest Neighbours and Support Vector Machine to complete a land cover layer for Riding Mountain National Park region from Sentinel 2 and Landsat 8 imagery.

Bio:

Sean Frey is the Geomatics Coordinator for Riding Mountain National Park. Combining his love of maps, technology and outdoors has allowed him to work for over 20 years in the geomatics field in a broad array of applications. Sean ‘s pragmatic approach to meeting the user needs of the park and sharing his experience, not to mention the waived conference fee, compelled him to present today.

Gaylen Eaton & Tom Sutton, North/South Consultants Inc.

A RPAS / GIS – assisted FireSmart assessment to protect people, homes and infrastructure

North/ South Consultants Inc. recently conducted a pilot project of a semi·automated community-wide FireSmart Assessment in partnership with a northern First Nation community. The project utilized a remotely piloted aerial system (RPAS) to obtain high resolution multispectral imagery. Advanced GIS and remote sensing techniques were used to map and remotely assess fire risk to homes and infrastructure within the community.

Bio:

Gaylen Eaton and Tom Sutton work for a Winnipeg environmental consulting company called North/South Consultants Inc.

Gaylen Eaton holds degrees from the University of Waterloo and an M.N.R.M. from the University of Manitoba as well as a GIS advanced Diploma from Red River College. Gaylen Eaton has been working in the fields of GIS, social science research and environmental consulting on a wide variety of projects for 20 years throughout Manitoba and Nunavut. The current project blends a passion for assisting communities with climate change adaptation and the use of advanced technology and techniques.

Tom Sutton holds a bachelor degree from Bishops University and a GIS advanced Diploma from Red River College. Tom has been working as a GIS specialist for 16 years. As both the RPAS pilot and the GIS analyst on this project, Tom is intrigued with using emerging technology and advanced remote sensing techniques to solve problems.

Lawrence Bird

Dominion: GIS-based Art

An overview of three video projection projects that use harvested Google Earth satellite imagery to engage with geography and politics: “parallel” (2016), which tracked the 49th parallel; “Transect” (2014), on the Greenwich Prime Meridian; and “Dominion” (2018) , which documents the Dominion Land Survey and its impact on the prairies. The intention is to discuss a cultural dimension of GIS and open up avenues for collaboration between artists, geographers and technologists.

Bio:

Lawrence works in architecture, urbanism, and the visual arts. His visual art practise focuses on the relationship of image to space; he frequently employs harvested satellite and aerial imagery. His art work has been installed at RAW:Gallery (Winnipeg), Inter/Access Gallery (Toronto), Furtherfield Gallery (London, UK),  Greenwich Royal Naval Hospital (UK), Espace Architecture La Cambre Horta (Brussels), and the International Symposium on Electronic Arts 2017 (Manizales, Colombia).

In his design practise his key concerns are social – how do we live together in the city? – and about our regional context – the prairie city. As a member of the Board of Directors of Sustainable Building Manitoba and Manitoba’s Green Action Centre, one of his roles is to promote public engagement with sustainability in planning, architecture, and urban infrastructure. Until recently an Architect & Planner at pico ARCHITECTURE inc., he will be Urban Designer at Sputnik Architecture from November.

Co-editor of the book “Re-Imagining Winnipeg”, on new urban visions for Winnipeg, Lawrence has also published on architecture and media in Canadian Architect and Leonardo, among other venues. He is currently co-editing a book on Winnipeg’s Warming Huts. Lawrence has a PhD in History & Theory of Architecture and a professional degree in architecture from McGill University, as well as a Master’s degree in City Design & Social Science from London School of Economics. His research has been funded by SSHRC, FQRSC, and the Canada Council for the Arts.

Shirley Thompson, Natural Resources Institute at University of Manitoba

Mapping Traditional Land Use

Traditional land use mapping is often used to tell Indigenous peoples’ story of land-use but is it applicable to planning food researchers and land use planners? This research applies traditional land use to undertake food analysis, explore food sovereignty and for land use planning. Traditional land use map biographies chronicle the extensive sustenance harvesting of community members. Wasagamack community members continue to use their traditional territory for fulfilling their food, shelter, and cultural needs.
Based on food harvesting maps, the Wasagamack First Nation foodshed is estimated to be 13,378 square kilometers in northeastern Manitoba, Canada. Mapping traditional use of Indigenous lands generated abundant evidence of Indigenous peoples’ on-going connection to their vast territory. All the Wasagamack people interviewed (n=57) regarded the land to be perfect the way the Creator made it.

Bio:

Shirley Thompson is an associate professor at the Natural Resources Institute, University of Manitoba. Her research focuses on community development and rural planning using GIS and video. She teaches an information communication technology class that covers GIS, social media and film.

Megan Jakilazek, City of Selkirk

Using GIS in Capital Asset Management Programs (CAMP)

The City of Selkirk has been working on their Capital Asset Management Program for over 3 years now, and has been recognized as a leader in Asset Management practice in Manitoba. With over 6600 assets in the Asset Registry, and over 33 characteristics documented for each asset – the program is quickly growing. Cloud based GIS is a powerful tool that can be used in many ways for the purpose of Asset Management. See how the City of Selkirk is using mobile GIS Apps like Survey 123 and collector App to grow their Asset Registry, conduct their routine condition evaluation assessments, and even monitor and track key life-cycle activities.

Bio:

Megan is the Asset Management/GIS Technician for the City of Selkirk, and has been in the role for 2.5 years. Within her role with the City of Selkirk, Megan leads their Capital Asset Management team, as well as manages all spatial data for the City. She holds a Bachelor of Science at the University of Winnipeg, majoring in Geography and Environmental Studies. In addition, Megan has completed a post graduate diploma in GIS from Red River College, and a Professional Certificate in Asset Management through the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia.

Tony Viveiros & Kayla Peterniak, Manitoba Sustainable Development

Using Survey 123 for Watercraft Inspections of Aquatic Invasive Species in Manitoba

Manitoba Fisheries has been inspecting watercraft for aquatic invasive species for almost 20 years. Each year, over 10,000 inspections occur throughout the province. Traditionally, these inspections have occurred using pen and paper; however, starting in 2019 Survey 123 for ArcGIS was used. This presentation will outline the work undertaken by Manitoba Fisheries and Forestry to digitally transform the watercraft inspection workflow.

Bio:

Tony Viveiros is GIS Database Manager with the Inventory and Analysis section of the Forestry and Peatlands Branch of Manitoba Sustainable Development. Tony’s responsibilities include GIS database management, analysis, support, web mapping, web app development and supervising GIS staff that work on forestry datasets. Tony was on secondment with GeoManitoba part-time from 2012 to 2015 where he championed the implementation of ArcGIS Online web GIS technology. Tony is an active member of the Departmental Open Government Committee and a proponent of transforming public service through GIS innovation.
Prior to starting employment with Manitoba Conservation in 2008, Tony worked as a GIS Analyst for 10 years with a large multi-national forestry company in northwestern Ontario and has also worked for Agriculture Canada. Tony is a Certified GIS Professional (GISP) with a Masters in GIS from the University of Calgary (2007), a certificate in GIS from the College of Geographic Sciences (COGS, 1995) and a Biology Degree from the University of Toronto (1990). Tony is a former Board member of the Alberta Geomatics Group and Past President of the Manitoba GIS User Group (MGUG).

Kayla Peterniak is the Aquatic Invasive Species Ecologist for the Province of Manitoba’s Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Program.  Kayla’s main responsibility is managing the Province’s Watercraft Inspection Program. This program staffs 24 Watercraft Inspectors throughout the province at strategic pinch points to intercept watercraft and assess their risk of transporting AIS by conducting triage surveys and performing physical inspections and decontaminations when necessary. Kayla holds a Bachelor of Science in Ecology and Environmental Biology from the University of Manitoba.   Kayla has been working with the Department of Sustainable Development since 2012 and with the AIS program in since 2014.

Dr. Stephen Petersen, Conservation and Research for Assiniboine Park Zoo

Polar bear denning distribution and hotspots in the Canadian Arctic

Female polar bears use dens that are built into earth or snow in order to provide a safe and warm location to give birth and raise their cubs for the first several months of life. During this time the new family is buffered from the external environment and thought to be especially sensitive to disturbance. In order to manage Arctic landscapes for an increasing human presence it is critical that communities and governments know the distribution of polar bear denning habitat. To assist in this process we compiled existing data on polar bear denning (n = 64 sources) in Canada between 1967 and 2018. These include traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) studies, government and consultant reports, peer-reviewed scientific articles, and unpublished data acquired through data-sharing agreements with local jurisdictions. We synthesized these data to create a map of known denning locations across the Canadian Arctic. We then used the point-location data and performed Optimized Hot-Spot Analysis to understand larger distributional patterns in polar bear denning. We found that denning was heterogeneous across the Arctic but that most coastal regions in northern Canada supported denning. Optimized Hot-Spot Analysis identified significant denning regions (Manitoba and Ontario, Gulf of Boothia, and eastern Victoria Island). Due to non-uniform sampling these hot-spots may represent increased sampling effort, higher concentration of suitable denning habitat, or some combination of both. The analysis also highlighted gaps that remain in the knowledge of polar bear denning habitat distribution in Canada: filling these gaps will aid the conservation and co-management of polar bears.

Bio:

Dr. Stephen Petersen is the Director of Conservation and Research for Assiniboine Park Zoo. The Conservation and Research Department runs active field and zoo based programs from the labs and offices at the Leatherdale International Polar Bear Conservation Centre. His department has a strong focus on the ecology, behaviour, and genetics of Arctic marine mammals but also is expanding their efforts to conserve species in the prairies of southern Manitoba. Use of novel technology plays a large role in the projects we lead in order to develop ways to study animals with less disturbance. The placement of a research focused group at a zoological facility also provides an exciting opportunity to study and conserve species in human care as well as those in the wild.

Jon Neufeld, TECTERRA

The global Free and Open Software for Geospatial (FOSS 4G) event is coming to Canada 2020

The global Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial (FOSS4G) event is coming to Canada in 2020. This short talk will provide highlights on the event, show how you can get involved, and why it’s important for the Canadian geospatial community.

Bio:

Jonathan Neufeld is a relationship-based leader, employing big-picture thinking and a proven ability to translate ideas into action. He is a veteran of the geospatial industry, and now as CEO of TECTERRA is passionate about moving the state of technology forward.

He has received a B.Sc in Geomatics Engineering, from the University of Calgary, and an MBA through the Haskayne School of Business.

He is a father of three young children; an avid hiker, climber, and cyclist; and is passionate and unwaveringly optimistic about where technology will take us into the future.

Workshop Speakers:

Jacques Marcoux, CBC News

Intro to PostGIS

PostGIS is an extension to the popular and open-source database engine PostgreSQL that enables users to query spatial data through custom and reproducible SQL-like code, rather than by clicking through menus in a graphical user-interface like ArcGIS or QGIS. Learn how PostGIS can help you do heavy lifting by performing complex queries at lightning speeds as part of your current workflow.

Bio:

Jacques Marcoux is an award-winning investigative reporter with CBC News specializing in data analysis. Previously he worked as a radio and television reporter for the CBC’s French network Radio-Canada, as a public relations officer for one of the world’s largest agricultural marketing agencies and worked in competitive intelligence gathering in the financial industry. He holds a Bachelor of commerce from the I.H. Asper School of Business from the University of Manitoba, Canada.
Jacques’ areas of interest include using various open-source resources for  accomplishing geospatial analyses, database design and automation of complex tasks using Python, PostGIS and QGIS as his primary tools.

Matt Sebesteny, Strategic Community Consulting Inc.

20 Minute QGIS Introductory Workshop

Quick 20 minute workshop showing the basic abilities of QGIS, along with illustrating few basic tasks and answering attendee questions.

Bio:

Passionate about pragmatic solutions to design and build more sustainable ecosystems, Matt holds accreditation in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Project Management, with a professional background in forestry, urban design and aquatic watershed conservation.

Matt has collaborated with the City of Winnipeg and Province of Manitoba on a number of projects including urban forestry renewal initiatives, recreational angling support programs, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) invasion mitigation, bathymetric surveys, asset mapping and geospatial systems design. Matt also engages with the Manitoba GIS User’s Group to continually stay active with industry developments and competencies.

As SCC’s geospatial analyst, Matt is involved in examining and using geospatial information to interpret and explain environmental challenges, trends and opportunities.

Jacques Marcoux, CBC News

GIS using Python (Geopandas)

Get a quick overview of how Python’s most popular GIS library ‘Geopandas’ can help you automate, import, query, manipulate, export spatial data, and output publish-ready graphics in seconds.

Bio:

Jacques Marcoux is an award-winning investigative reporter with CBC News specializing in data analysis. Previously he worked as a radio and television reporter for the CBC’s French network Radio-Canada, as a public relations officer for one of the world’s largest agricultural marketing agencies and worked in competitive intelligence gathering in the financial industry. He holds a Bachelor of commerce from the I.H. Asper School of Business from the University of Manitoba, Canada.
Jacques’ areas of interest include using various open-source resources for  accomplishing geospatial analyses, database design and automation of complex tasks using Python, PostGIS and QGIS as his primary tools.

Melanie Chabot & Antoni Ros Martinez, Canadian Red Cross

OSM Mapathon – Improving Local Data to Assist in Emergency Response

Bio:

Melanie has been with the Canadian Red Cross for 1 year as the GIS Coordinator leading the Missing Maps domestic pilot project, responsible for managing the project and for recruiting and managing CRC’s first mapping volunteer team to support Missing Maps and wider GIS activities. Before that, Melanie was conducting research at the University of Guelph in Ontario that focused on measuring surface roughness with terrestrial LiDAR and improving soil moisture estimates from radar remote sensing. She currently lives in Hudson Bay, SK – a small community near the MB border that is ironically 800 km SW of the body of water after which it is named.

Toni started over two years ago with the Canadian Red Cross (CRC) in Alberta; first as an Emergency Management Volunteer, later as an Emergency Management Coordinator and currently as the GIS Analyst for Canadian Operations. In his current role, Toni is responsible for: acting as CRC’s focal point for geo-spatial analyses and geomatics; leading the GIS team during emergency response; GIS tool maintenance & development; relationship building for geo-spatial data sharing with key stakeholders; and supports the Missing Maps program where necessary. Originally from Barcelona, Toni is fluent in three languages and before moving to Canada, he worked and lived in 5 different countries across three continents. Toni holds a MSc in Geography of Environmental Risks & Human Security, a Masters degree in Cartographic Production & GIS and a Bachelors in Geography

Mark Ireland, Safe Software Inc.

Data Wrangling With FME: An Introduction to FME using the Geography of Soccer Stadiums

Everyone at MGUG is a geographer. In this digital age that means all of us face daily challenges wrangling datasets in multiple formats, structures, and locations. FME is a Data Integration platform that reduces the workload, with tools at both the Desktop and Enterprise level.

In this session we’ll use the quirky example of English soccer stadiums to show how FME can integrate different sources of information, join and manipulate their contents, automate the process, and generally efficiently handle the time-consuming parts of our day-to-day data wrangling. New users will learn what FME can do; existing users will learn some FME techniques that they’d perhaps never considered before. Soccer fans will learn which team’s supporters have the longest journey to follow their team and which is the optimum route to visit every single professional soccer stadium.

Bio:

Mark Ireland has spent a solid – but nomadic – thirty years in the spatial field. After spells as a land surveyor, digitizer, GIS analyst, software developer, technical trainer, and photogrammetrist, Mark is currently employed as a technical evangelist with Safe Software Inc. An “evangelist”, he says, is like Tom Hanks in the film Big; you get to play with a bunch of cool toys and then tell everyone how great they all are.

Luckily Mark loves to write and teach about GIS, tinker with geographic data formats, and help people use spatial technologies in new and interesting ways. In the recent past he designed and implemented the FME Certification Program, contributed nearly 200 posts to the Safe Software blog, and for many years wrote all of Safe’s training content.

Outside of work Mark gets roped into doing cartographic projects for friends, but still finds time for a little fishing and family history research.